Self-management Solutions for Type 2 Diabetes

diabetes kit

Take the Self-management Solutions for Type 2 Diabetes quiz.

Test your knowledge about self-management solutions for type 2 diabetes.

When your blood sugar is not well controlled, it is helpful to:

All of the answers are correct. However, the best answer is "All of the above". When your blood sugar is not well controlled, it is useful to monitor your blood sugar more frequently and at different times of the day. Also, keep a logbook of your blood sugar results, exercise/activity, the carbohydrate content of the food, and medication doses (including insulin). You can review the log book with your medical provider to problem solve why you are having difficulty controlling your blood sugar.
In general, the blood sugar is lowered with:

All of the answers are correct. However, the best answer is "All of the above". Exercise or increased activity, weight loss, a diet that does not have an excessive amount of carbohydrate, and diabetes medications including insulin, all lower your blood sugar.
Medications that may cause a "below target" or low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) when used by themselves as a single therapy are:

Insulin releasing pills including the sulfonylureas and glinides can cause low blood sugars (hypoglycemia).
There is always a risk of "below target" or low blood sugars (hypoglycemia) when using pills that cause insulin to be released from the pancreas (sulfonylureas, glinides), or when using insulin therapy.

True! Pills that cause insulin to be released from the pancreas and insulin therapy both have hypoglycemia (low blood sugars) as a side effect.
When using pills that cause "below target" or hypoglycemia (low blood sugars) in combination with pills that don't cause a low blood sugar, there is no risk of getting a "low".

False! Pills that cause insulin to be released from the pancreas have hypoglycemia (low blood sugars) as a side effect, whether they are used alone or in combination with other medications.
If you are treated with pills that cause insulin to be released from the pancreas, or treated with insulin therapy and have hypoglycemia (blood sugars below your target range), you should:

When you are getting blood sugars below your target range, you should discuss what is happening with your medical provider. You may need to modify your diabetes therapy or make lifestyle changes.
When you have type 2 diabetes, your blood sugar may increase when you:

All of the answers are correct. However, the best answer is "All of the above". Your blood sugar may be too high because of weight gain, inactivity, stress, illness, excess carbohydrate (sugar and starch) in the diet, or because you need an adjustment in your diabetes medication.


©2007-2017 Collective work Martha Nolte Kennedy,
The Regents of the University of California.
All rights reserved.